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animalwelfarists:

10 safe ways for your cat to play
By Colleen Dougherty


From the time we are born we have a relationship with toys. Toys help us hone our senses of sight, hearing, and touch, develop physical coordination, and become keys to express our interests. Toys entertain us, help us relieve stress and boredom, and burn off excess energy.




Interestingly, toys function pretty much the same way for our pets.




By there’s more to play than simply dropping a toy on the floor and letting your feline have at it – one must consider safety, moderation, variety, and other factors. Here are nine of them:




Variety is key: Cats need a variety of toys that relate to different aspects of their personalities, like stalking, chasing, and snuggling. Mouse-sized toys can be hunted and “caught.” Your cat may even “gift” you with her catch. String toys can be dragged around to simulate the chase (and give you and your cat some quality time together.) Just remember to let her “catch the prey,” otherwise the game may be frustrating. Giving her a treat after the catch completes the hunt-catch-eat cycle.




Play time: Keep play sessions to about 10 to 20 minutes, so as not to overtire her, and never leave string toys lying around.




String can be deadly: Contrary to the cute pictures of kittens with balls of yarn, string can be dangerous. Cats can’t spit things out, only throw them up or pass them. Strings or rubber bands caught in intestines can kill a cat, so always store these things out of reach.




Laser pointers: Laser pointers are fun, but use caution and never shine the beam directly in your cat’s eyes, or bounce it off a reflective surface. Damage can occur in less than 10 seconds. Use only lasers made for cats that have 5 milliwatts or less strength. Lasers made for business presentations are too strong. As an alternative, shine a lamp off a reflective surface, such as a shiny bracelet, watch, or pinwheel. Make sure the play area is free of anything your cat could fall on and hurt the feline; remember – she’s chasing the red dot and not watching where she’s going.




Balls: Balls and crumpled pieces of paper are great fun to chase and bat around. A ping pong ball in a bathtub is even more fun because the “prey” cannot escape. Just remember to put the ball away before you go to bed, lest the game resume in the middle of the night…




Scratching posts: Cats instinctively need to scratch, and posts also allow stretching and releasing pent up energy. No matter how torn up, abused, and aesthetically unpleasing a scratching post gets, don’t throw it away; if you do, your feline may get upset for discarding the trophy of her hard work.




Stuffed toys: Make sure stuffed toys have safe stuffing, and no small parts that could be swallowed. Toys made just for pets, or kids 3 years of age and younger, are generally safe.




Catnip: Kittens under 6 months don’t usually respond to catnip, but older cats may love it. Some get aggressive with it, however, so if you have more than one cat, test their reactions separately at first… Otherwise you may end up with a bar brawl.




Toy rotation: Switch out toys once in a while (except for the toy she plays with or snuggles with every day – don’t make that one disappear).




“Custom” toys: Crumpled paper, cardboard boxes and tubes, and paper bags (handles removed), and other seemingly ordinary household items can entertain your feline for hours.




Ready, set, play…

animalwelfarists:

10 safe ways for your cat to play

By Colleen Dougherty

From the time we are born we have a relationship with toys. Toys help us hone our senses of sight, hearing, and touch, develop physical coordination, and become keys to express our interests. Toys entertain us, help us relieve stress and boredom, and burn off excess energy.

Interestingly, toys function pretty much the same way for our pets.

By there’s more to play than simply dropping a toy on the floor and letting your feline have at it – one must consider safety, moderation, variety, and other factors. Here are nine of them:

Variety is key: Cats need a variety of toys that relate to different aspects of their personalities, like stalking, chasing, and snuggling. Mouse-sized toys can be hunted and “caught.” Your cat may even “gift” you with her catch. String toys can be dragged around to simulate the chase (and give you and your cat some quality time together.) Just remember to let her “catch the prey,” otherwise the game may be frustrating. Giving her a treat after the catch completes the hunt-catch-eat cycle.

Play time: Keep play sessions to about 10 to 20 minutes, so as not to overtire her, and never leave string toys lying around.

String can be deadly: Contrary to the cute pictures of kittens with balls of yarn, string can be dangerous. Cats can’t spit things out, only throw them up or pass them. Strings or rubber bands caught in intestines can kill a cat, so always store these things out of reach.

Laser pointers: Laser pointers are fun, but use caution and never shine the beam directly in your cat’s eyes, or bounce it off a reflective surface. Damage can occur in less than 10 seconds. Use only lasers made for cats that have 5 milliwatts or less strength. Lasers made for business presentations are too strong. As an alternative, shine a lamp off a reflective surface, such as a shiny bracelet, watch, or pinwheel. Make sure the play area is free of anything your cat could fall on and hurt the feline; remember – she’s chasing the red dot and not watching where she’s going.

Balls: Balls and crumpled pieces of paper are great fun to chase and bat around. A ping pong ball in a bathtub is even more fun because the “prey” cannot escape. Just remember to put the ball away before you go to bed, lest the game resume in the middle of the night…

Scratching posts: Cats instinctively need to scratch, and posts also allow stretching and releasing pent up energy. No matter how torn up, abused, and aesthetically unpleasing a scratching post gets, don’t throw it away; if you do, your feline may get upset for discarding the trophy of her hard work.

Stuffed toys: Make sure stuffed toys have safe stuffing, and no small parts that could be swallowed. Toys made just for pets, or kids 3 years of age and younger, are generally safe.

Catnip: Kittens under 6 months don’t usually respond to catnip, but older cats may love it. Some get aggressive with it, however, so if you have more than one cat, test their reactions separately at first… Otherwise you may end up with a bar brawl.

Toy rotation: Switch out toys once in a while (except for the toy she plays with or snuggles with every day – don’t make that one disappear).

“Custom” toys: Crumpled paper, cardboard boxes and tubes, and paper bags (handles removed), and other seemingly ordinary household items can entertain your feline for hours.

Ready, set, play…

(via veterinaryrambles)

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animals-animals-animals:

Broad-billed Motmot (by pattymcgann)

animals-animals-animals:

Broad-billed Motmot (by pattymcgann)

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Rabbit Care

theexoticvet:

All 60+ breeds of domestic rabbit are descended from the European wild rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus. The rabbits found in North America are Cottontails from the genus Sylvilagus and are only distantly related. Cottontails have never been domesticated and do not make good pets.

Lifespan
The average lifespan for a well cared for rabbit varies but is between 7-9 years.

Spaying & Neutering
Female rabbits have a very high risk of developing uterine cancer if left intact. They should be spayed around 4-6 months of age which can greatly decrease this risk. Male rabbits can be neutered as young as 3.5 months of age. Spaying and neutering both sexes can make them calmer, reduce aggressive and dominance behavior, and prevents overpopulation. When done by an experienced veterinarian these procedures are safe and rabbits live longer healthier lives.

Housing
Rabbits should be kept indoors in cages as large as possible. Solid bottomed cages are best, avoid any that have wire or mesh bottoms. Minimally your rabbit should be able to stand on his hind legs without touching the top of the cage and be able to take 3 hops in any direction. Substrate in the bottom of the cage can be any number of things but avoid cedar or pine chips. These have aromatic oils that can cause respiratory issues and liver disease. Whatever you choose it should be changed at least once weekly but can also “spot clean” during the week. Some good choices for substrate are Carefresh™, aspen shavings,  and shredded paper.
Many people give rabbits their own room in a house or surround the cage with a play pen so they can come and go as they please but use the cage as a “home base”. If you do this make sure your home is bunny proof! Rabbits will chew on any wires, wooden objects, toys, etc. that you leave and they can get into even the tiniest spaces. They can also climb up onto furniture so take that into consideration.
Make sure the habitat has plenty of room for hay, food bowl, water, and a hide. You can purchase plastic hides or make one yourself. It is very important your rabbit have several hiding areas to choose from especially for house rabbits.

Litter Training
Rabbits can be litter box trained just like cats. Keeping them in a single room or small area with a litter box in one corner until they use it regularly is one way to train them. Sometimes putting a small amount of hay in the box will encourage them. You can also put some droppings into the box to show them where the proper area is. Every once in a while a rabbit will choose a different corner to go in, just move the litter box there as it is very hard to get them to change. Be patient and most rabbits will learn.

Cecotrophs
Rabbits produce a special kind of stool early in the morning called a cecotroph. These are soft, sticky, clusters of stool and look unlike the normal hard pellets they produce. Rabbits will pull these directly from their anus and consume them to help get vital nutrients and beneficial bacteria. You should not see these in the cage and if you do, you may mistake them for diarrhea. A rabbit that is not consuming its cecotrophs is ill and needs to be seen by a veterinarian. Overweight or arthritic bunnies that are unable to contort themselves and eat the cecotrophs will also be unable to consume them and this can cause health problems.

Diet
The main component of a healthy rabbit diet is hay and it should always be available. Timothy hay is great but there are several other varieties and these can be offered on different days or mixed. Avoid Alfalfa hay as it is too high in calories and calcium for adult rabbits. Greens are the other important aspect of diet and a rabbit should get about 2 cups of vegetables per 5 lbs (2.2 kg) of body weight every day. Pellets are not a necessary component and if offered at all should be no more than 1/4 c per 5 lbs (2.2 kg) of body weight a day.

Exercise
It is important that your rabbit get several hours of exercise daily. Rabbits that stay in their cages all day can develop health and behavioral issues. If you have a play pen for them or a room make sure it has plenty of toys. On nice days you can put the play pen outside so your rabbit can graze on fresh grass and get some sun. Make sure that it is not any warmer than about 70 degrees F, any warmer and they can suffer from heat stroke. Also ensure your lawn has not been sprayed with any chemicals. Always supervise your rabbit’s play time and never leave them outside alone!

Water
Water bottles should be emptied and cleaned every single day. Bacteria can grow in them and make your rabbit sick if they are not. Some rabbits prefer water bowls and will drink more water if offered this way.

Chewing
Rabbit’s teeth are constantly growing and they need things to chew on to wear them down properly. You can purchase wooden toys for your local pet store but you can also make your own. Toilet paper tubes filled with hay make excellent chew toys but you can also offer empty cardboard boxes, oatmeal containers, cereal boxes, and the like. There are also woven grass huts and tubes you can purchase that can be hidden in as well as chewed on.

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gravityfallsinfinite:

"It’s all led up to this.."

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Tags: FINALLY
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pixiesizedprincess:

New shirt design for sale!
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f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

The Dhammakaya Temple,Luke Duggleby Photography

The Worlds Largest Buddhist Temple


The enormous Phra Dhammakaya Temple on the outskirts of Bangkok is renowned throughout Thailand for its mass ceremonies. From monk ordinations to celebrating Buddhist holy days the temple holds vast ceremonies involving tens, sometimes hundreds, of thousands of participants.
With centres all over the world and a live to air television network to view such events it is one of the most influencial and powerful Buddhist movements in the world.


(via 4-of-a-kind)

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Anonymous said: Do dragons have any weaknesses?

queersherlockian:

teamfreekickass:

HURTFUL WORDS

be nice to dragons!

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supernormalstep:

Supernormal Step is updated!
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teenifies:

zisnap:

image

 

(Source: beauziful, via darknephilim)

Tags: oops guilty
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conceal, don’t feel, don’t let them know

conceal, don’t feel, don’t let them know

(Source: iamnevertheone, via briannathestrange)

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sdzoo:

Giraffe calf meets the herd for the first time and cuteness ensues. Watch the full video.

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tohdaryl:

The encounter with the Shark God. 

tohdaryl:

The encounter with the Shark God. 

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Sou-chan
I wish I could be like you.
I want to be able to tell the truth and still have a smile on my face afterward too.

(Source: tsugomori, via liberteegalitehomosexualite)

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typette:

one of Disney’s greatest films that soooo many people never took seriously. Seriously, how many people here have seen it? It’s amazing.

typette:

one of Disney’s greatest films that soooo many people never took seriously.

Seriously, how many people here have seen it? It’s amazing.

(via sonnelittle)

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animals-animals-animals:

Sleeping Lion Cub (by wwarby)

animals-animals-animals:

Sleeping Lion Cub (by wwarby)